Dispatches and Thoughts

On 10 December 1948, the United Nation's General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Since that time, there have been many times of hope and disappointment, through wars fought, treaties ratified, human rights violations, and increased monitoring. This blog will discuss the current state of the world's human rights.
unicef:

CAN YOU SEE ME? Nirmala (ge 16)Nirmala left school to support herself and her two younger sisters following the death of their parents from AIDS. On a good day, Nirmala earns up to 120 Nepalese Rupees (about US$1.35) by working in the paddies and surrounding hills in Biraltoli, her impoverished village. She uses the money to feed the family and ensure that her sisters stay in school.
©UNICEF/Shehzad Noorani
To see more: http://www.unicef.orgVisit UNICEF Nepal: http://www.unicef.org/nepal

unicef:

CAN YOU SEE ME? Nirmala (ge 16)
Nirmala left school to support herself and her two younger sisters following the death of their parents from AIDS. On a good day, Nirmala earns up to 120 Nepalese Rupees (about US$1.35) by working in the paddies and surrounding hills in Biraltoli, her impoverished village. She uses the money to feed the family and ensure that her sisters stay in school.

©UNICEF/Shehzad Noorani

To see more: http://www.unicef.org
Visit UNICEF Nepal: http://www.unicef.org/nepal

halftheskymovement:








Two months ago, a young mother of two in Pakistan was stoned to death by her relatives for possessing a cell phone on the order of a tribal court. Arifa Bibi’s case, while tragic, was not unique, and human rights campaigners fear this form of execution may be on rise, especially in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Iraq. Show your support for ending this practice by signing this Change.org petition to United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon urging the United Nations Human Rights office to denounce executions by stoning and learn more via The Independent.
 

halftheskymovement:

Two months ago, a young mother of two in Pakistan was stoned to death by her relatives for possessing a cell phone on the order of a tribal court. Arifa Bibi’s case, while tragic, was not unique, and human rights campaigners fear this form of execution may be on rise, especially in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Iraq. 

Show your support for ending this practice by signing this Change.org petition to United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon urging the United Nations Human Rights office to denounce executions by stoning and learn more via The Independent.
 

theatlantic:

Why Chemical Weapons Are Different

The current global—and Congressional—debate about whether to deploy force against Syria for its use of sarin gas on civilians will depend, in part, on the whether the reasons for a post-World War I agreement banning the offensive use of chemical and biological weapons continue to be honored.
The 1925 Geneva Protocol did not focus on World War I’s terrible new 20th-century technologies that made 19th-century military tactics obsolete and led to mass slaughter: advancements in barbed wire, machine guns, and artillery led to incomprehensible and horrible effects on combatants. It was the impact of gas use on both the Western and Eastern fronts that led to the prohibition on chemical and biological warfare, even though it had led to only about one percent of the deaths there. The protocol viewed gas warfare as different from the other methods of mass killing, and banned the use of “asphyxiating, poisonous or other gases” as well as “bacteriological methods.”
Read more. [Image: Mohamed Abdullah/Reuters]

theatlantic:

Why Chemical Weapons Are Different

The current global—and Congressional—debate about whether to deploy force against Syria for its use of sarin gas on civilians will depend, in part, on the whether the reasons for a post-World War I agreement banning the offensive use of chemical and biological weapons continue to be honored.

The 1925 Geneva Protocol did not focus on World War I’s terrible new 20th-century technologies that made 19th-century military tactics obsolete and led to mass slaughter: advancements in barbed wire, machine guns, and artillery led to incomprehensible and horrible effects on combatants. It was the impact of gas use on both the Western and Eastern fronts that led to the prohibition on chemical and biological warfare, even though it had led to only about one percent of the deaths there. The protocol viewed gas warfare as different from the other methods of mass killing, and banned the use of “asphyxiating, poisonous or other gases” as well as “bacteriological methods.”

Read more. [Image: Mohamed Abdullah/Reuters]

halftheskymovement:

An Indian court has convicted four men of the rape and murder of a young woman last December who died from injuries resulting from her brutal gang rape. The sentences are expected Wednesday, and include the possibility of hanging. “We can celebrate this particular case,” said Rebecca John, supreme court lawyer and prominent advocate for women in India. “As we celebrate this case, let us mourn for the other cases that are not highlighted.”Read more via Yahoo News.

halftheskymovement:

An Indian court has convicted four men of the rape and murder of a young woman last December who died from injuries resulting from her brutal gang rape. The sentences are expected Wednesday, and include the possibility of hanging. “We can celebrate this particular case,” said Rebecca John, supreme court lawyer and prominent advocate for women in India. “As we celebrate this case, let us mourn for the other cases that are not highlighted.”

Read more via Yahoo News.

halftheskymovement:

"Private re-homing" is a term typically used by owners seeking new homes for their pets, but is also a term used to describe children tossed into a loose, underground Internet network where desperate parents seek new homes for kids they regret adopting. Re-homing is that the process is far cheaper than formal adoptions. 
Reuters analyzed 5,029 posts from a five-year period on one Internet message board, a Yahoo group. On average, a child was advertised for re-homing there once a week.
Read more about the investigation at Reuters.

halftheskymovement:

"Private re-homing" is a term typically used by owners seeking new homes for their pets, but is also a term used to describe children tossed into a loose, underground Internet network where desperate parents seek new homes for kids they regret adopting. Re-homing is that the process is far cheaper than formal adoptions. 

Reuters analyzed 5,029 posts from a five-year period on one Internet message board, a Yahoo group. On average, a child was advertised for re-homing there once a week.

Read more about the investigation at Reuters.